Wojciech Babski

Войцех Бабски (Wojciech Babski) – современный польский художник. Закончил учебу в Силезском политехническом институте, но связал себя с живописью. В последнее время рисует, в основном, женщин. Фокусируется на проявлении эмоций, стремится к получению как можно большего эффекта простыми средствами..

Любит цвет, но часто использует оттенки черного и серого, для достижения наилучшего впечатления. Не боится экспериментировать с разными новыми техниками. В последнее время набирает всё большую популярность за рубежом, в основном, в Великобритании, где с успехом продает свои работы, которые уже можно найти во многих частных коллекциях. Кроме искусства интересуется космологией и философией. Слушает джаз. В настоящее время живет и работает в г. Катовице.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would

characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would

characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would

characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

Visitor-focused design — what good sites do

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make it work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of your organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.

How strong is your museum’s website as part of the whole offer? Does it reflect your identity as an organisation? Does it appeal to your visitors? What does it really need? Are there trends to pay attention to? Others to ignore? What makes the site appealing? What mistakes can you avoid?If your work involves museum websites these will be questions you’ll have to tackle, whether you’re commissioning a new site or just trying to keep the current one healthy.

On Exhibit: Lost Synagogues of Europe

This post will take you through the essential ways in which your site needs to answer key visitor questions for 2017. First, we’ll spin through the process we used. Then, the main points: three key groups of questions your site needs to answer for your visitors.

“He belonged to the Florentine School under the patronage of Lorenzo de’ Medici, a movement that Giorgio Vasari would

characterize less a hundred years later in his Vita of Botticelli as a golden age.”

Pablo Picasso

In view in the Yiddish Book Center’s Brechner Gallery now through March 2019, Lost Synagogues of Europe is a collection of early twentieth-century postcards on Jewish themes, many of them depicting synagogues in Eastern Europe that were destroyed during World War II. The postcards come from the collection of Frantisek Banyai, a Prague-based entrepreneur and son of Holocaust survivors who began amassing the collection 40 years ago and continues his search today

Finally, a dive into the building blocks that help a site work particularly effectively. Hopefully, you ’ll finish the post with a fresh perspective on your own site: you’ll be able to identify how to make work better for your visitors and advocate for effective change as part of organisation’s strategy. Of course, we threw some sites we built at Cogapp into the mix too.